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Passionate About Sales

Whether you were born with a passion for your craft or whether you learned it along the way, the bottom line is that without the passion, your success will not be consistent.  Consider the sales people that are recognized by the industry as being the best.  If you do a little research you will find that almost without exception they either cut their teeth on it following in their parent’s footsteps or they were just naturally, genuinely driven to help people.

Zig Ziglar
Very spiritually driven because of instances of what he saw as miraculous in his own life.  As a motivational speaker he helped shape the modern vocabulary of sales.

Ron Popeil
Popeil is the hands down king of the infomercials.  He says, “If I create a product, I can market it as well as or better than anyone on the planet.  I have the confidence and the passion.  People see that, and they know it is real.”

Erica Feidner
She sold over $41 million dollars in pianos for Steinway & Sons by taking the time to match-make people to the right piano.  For beginning players she wore the symbolic hat of piano teacher; for the experienced she matched their personalities to the personalities of the piano.  She made it personal.

Dale Carnegie
It wasn’t the products he sold that he is remembered for; it is the drive he had to teach others how to sell.

David Ogilvy
Ogilvy’s mantra was that he believed the best way to get new clients was to do notable work for existing ones.  His level of service is legendary.

Sales is Not a Profession for the Faint-Hearted
Even when you have the passion for your craft you have to be thick-skinned and resilient.  Know that even the most successful have days of frustration, but they recognize when they need to refresh their energy and seek ways to do so, because prospects can spot a fake a mile away.

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12 Ways to Stay Passionate

  1. Surround yourself with people who share your passion for sales.  It really will rub off on you.  It’s among the Laws of Attraction.
  2. Make lists – to-do lists; things that worked list; things that didn’t work.
  3. Carry a small notebook everywhere.  Noting inspirational ideas can help you freshen up your sales methods.
  4. Take Breaks – Schedule in time to change the view.  Leave your desk for lunch.
  5. Seek feedback on your efforts.  Love the good and learn from the not so good.
  6. Collaborate.  Brainstorming and sharing experiences with colleagues will energize you.
  7. Allow yourself to make mistakes; just make it a point to learn from them.  It will make others trust and respect you.
  8. Practice, practice, practice.  Give your sales pitch to family and friends and ask for their opinions.  Everything can always be made better, no matter how long you’ve been at it.
  9. Get lots of rest.  You can’t deliver energy if you don’t have any.
  10. Clean your workspace.  You will think clearer and feel more professional without clutter and with organization.
  11. Stay on top of new technology.
  12. Attend webinars and seminars to gain new ideas.

Imagine having customers who both appreciate the product – and remember how energetic, passionate, and genuine you were when you sold it to them.  It will get you repeat business.

Understanding and Mastering Rejection

It is fact, Gone With The Wind was rejected 38 times; Irving Stone’s, Lust for Life was rejected 16 times, and then went on to sell over 25 million copies, and Stephen King was told, “We are not interested in science fiction which deals with negative utopias  They do not sell.” There is an uncounted number of authors who heard “no” tons of times before they got their foot in the door – William Faulkner; George Orwell; John Grisham; Joseph Heller, John le Carre, J.K. Rowlings; Rudyard Kipling….  Imagine the loss, had they given up.

Understanding the reasons for rejection and having a call list that is geared for success can increase your odds of garnering that second call.  The bottom line is, when you work in a profession where you hear no repeatedly; you have to find your mettle and ramp up your persistence to turn the negatives into positives.

Human Factor in Rejection

Any number of a prospect’s personal issues may trigger a “no thanks.”  Just thank them for their time, and call someone else.

  • Discord at home
  • Personal financial worries
  • Bereavement
  • Discontent with their job
  • In a bad mood
  • Lack of confidence

Who You Call Matters 1198416_98477822

While connecting with a live voice feels encouraging, if you aren’t talking to someone who can invite you into the sales cycle, your connection has no value, unless you can get them to give you a referral.  Increase quality control at the lead generation level.  Purpose is served if Sales talks to Marketing.

  • Get selective about the job titles that are added to your data bank.
  • Be aware in the subtle shift in language when you’re searching for specific types of titles.  There is a fair amount of creativity at play when it comes to the exact wording of job titles.  Some sound more powerful than they are: Sales Leader, Sales Representative and Sales Associate, for example.
  •  While it makes sense to import such titles as VP of Sales; Director of Sales and even to some degree Manager of Sales – don’t over look the terms “Sales Enablement” and “Sales Effectiveness.” They are titles less called, but they hold the power to invite the coveted second call.

Quality Control at Lead Generation Level – More Positive Calling Session

  • Verify employment at LinkedIn and/or company websites before creating a lead.
  • Know that software that mass imports leads – lacks quality control.  It doesn’t check for employment.
  • Set up a list based on date employment was last verified.  By changing the date on it monthly you can re-verify employment on both your leads and contacts once a month, so no verified employment is older than a year – or whatever amount of time works for you.  It sounds like a lot of extra work – but once you get it in hand and do it every month – it really only takes a brief amount of time, and the end result is that sales is more apt to connect with someone who is still actually working at the company.  Save time; save money and live with a more productive call list.

When the Prospect Says No

  • Know that it isn’t personal
  • You haven’t reached the right person.
  • You called at an inconvenient time.
  • Your call script needs work.

If Your Enthusiasm is Low

  • Engage in more shoptalk with your coworkers.  Ask them about how they approach and handle different situations.  Shared tricks of the trade are invaluable.
  • Avoid the stress of stumbling.  Be sure you know about all upgrades your product has under gone.  Albert Einstein once said, “If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t know it well enough.”
  • Set reasonable goals for yourself to keep you moving.  Make it a game of personal challenge.
  • Attend some seminars where positive energy can be recharged.
  • If you haven’t taken any time off and treated yourself to a getaway – consider doing so.

While in sales “no” is heard more often than “yes” know that it doesn’t mean the end of the road.  Don’t give up without exhausting all possibilities.  If your product makes life easier and more productive for people, every “yes” that comes back and thanks you, will make the “no’s” pale in comparison.  Persistence is the name of the game.