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Real Up Your Sales Style

In 1974 I bought my first microwave oven from JC Penney.  Whenever a technology is new to the consumer, the price is always high for a handful of years.  The first microwave ovens hit the stores in 1967 so when I bought, I paid $750, which definitely taxed the household budget.  The product came with a one year guarantee, and at the time of the sale I was offered an extended warranty – which I turned down.  One year and three weeks later the microwave stopped working, and when I contacted the store, I was told, “Nothing we can do.  You didn’t buy the extended warranty.”

I decided to keep the problem human.  I sat down and wrote to the CEO of JC Penney’s.  I told him that I didn’t buy the extended warranty because I had grown up with JC Penney being a part of my family, and I trusted that as family they would do what was right – whether I bought the extended warranty or not.  I told him that their products were in every closet, on every shelf and in every drawer of our home.  I asked him to not break the trust that I had grown up having for the company.  He authorized the repairs at no charge.

When it comes to business, especially in this day of high tech everything, caution should be taken to not lose the human touch with your prospects.  While everyone appreciates the speed, the accuracy and the convenience of technology; no one wants to be nothing but a statistic in your analytics.

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Keep it Human

Keep it Warm
Talk with your prospects like they are professional “friends.” As you move through the sales cycle get to know them as people.  Learn about their family, significant events taking place in their life – weddings, new babies, great vacations.  Maybe they just built a new house; their child’s ball team took first place or they are thrilled with a new car they just parked in their garage.  Share a piece of yourself to open the door of friendship; they will give back. You will build trust by letting them know you care about them beyond their bank account.

Beyond Email
Email is awesome.  It is fast, and it is free, and there is a time and a place for it.  Some years back I was with a car insurance company that actually mailed me a birthday card each year, personally signed by my agent.  Had he sent me a birthday greeting via email – I would have been a lot less touched.  Yes, I know it was a marketing tool, but I still thought it a class act.

Be Human
While you may think your customers are impressed when you have all the answers, know that they are equally as impressed when you admit that you don’t.  There’s something reassuring and connecting when you admit to being human.  If you promise to find the answer, and follow through, you’ve demonstrated your good character and earned their respect.  Know too, admitting your mistakes and then responsibly fixing them, builds a level of trust that you can’t put a price on.

Let the Wisdom Kick In
The difference between a good teacher and a great one is that a great one will tell you that they learned more from their students than they taught them.  Every prospect has something to teach you, even the ones who say, “No thanks.”  It might be the questions they ask that drive you to research; it might be their leadership style that you get to observe, or it might simply be that they share something they’ve learned that makes your job easier.  Learning from others is the best way for you to grow, both personally and professionally.

It’s a new day.  Before you start calling consider your style.  Will the prospect hear a sales shark, or will they hear a new friend who wants to help them?  Will they hear irritation at a “No thanks,” or will they hear understanding and respect?  What kind of impression will you leave?  You can keep it business, and be real at the same time.

Incite: to stir up or provoke to action