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Solid Work Ethics for Success

 

At the end of the day, you are solely responsible for your success and your failure.  The sooner you realize that, you accept that, and integrate that into your work ethic, you will start being successful.”  Erin Cummings

Everything I know about work ethics I learned from my first employer.  I was just 16 and I went to work for The House of Fabrics.  I thought the $1.65 an hour I earned was a gold mine, so I tolerated the “warden” I worked for.  Mrs. Feldon, bless her heart, was nonnegotiable when it came to the rules, and today she has my thanks because I’m never late for anything and I honestly earn my dollars.

People want to buy the best, which means you have to be better than average to make the sale.  Sales is one of the most competitive fields you can be in.  If you have a quality product, someone will improve it, and trump you.  While it’s important to stay abreast of the advances in technology and constantly upgrade your product, the best way to hold on to the leading edge is by flaunting your good character; be known for more than your product.  Follow a Moral Compass

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Work Ethic; Moral Code for Success

Integrity
Always strike a fair deal.  Promise what you can deliver and deliver what you promise.  Own up to mistakes, be quick with apologies, and make things better than right. Dishonesty will get you by in the moment – but it will come back and cost you in the long-run.

Sense of Responsibility
It isn’t the hours you work; it’s the work you put in the hours.  Imagine you own the company and build the revenue like it’s your personal bank account.  Be accountable.

Dedication to Quality
If you deliver less than high quality, those that trust your product will leave when the reality plays out.  Know that no matter how good, everything can always be made better.

Discipline
Develop an organized system that keeps you on task and leads you through the steps to get the job done.  Have a clear sense of priorities and systematically follow it. It isn’t about clock-watching; it’s about delivering on your word.

Teamwork
If one person could do it all, there would be no need for colleagues.  Hillary Clinton once said, “It takes a village to raise a child.”  Know that it takes a team to run a company.  Learn the fine art of respectfully delegating tasks, and when you have a spare moment, help a colleague if they are on overload with theirs.  What goes around, comes around.  Strong team; strong company. 

What will all that get you?
It will get you repeat business, respect, and job security in a competitive world.  Remember, you teach people who you are with your actions.  When you know that your job is well done you get peace of mind that can’t be bought.

Incite: to stir up or provoke to action